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Life on the Ocean Wave - The Spanish Main - Bermuda Triangle and Sargasso Sea

 Seize the day and sign up before the mast on this 10 day blue water adventure. Don't forget the tropical nights too. You get twice as much holiday by participating in the night watches. The sensation of steering a tall ship under full canvas in the absolute dark, with only the faint glimmer of the ships compass is something really special. When you come off watch and the responsibility fades, then a cool beer under the stars with your ship mates is as memorable as the day time activities.

Sailing from St Martin you are on the edge of the Spanish Main where treasure ships from Central America would run the gauntlet of privateers and pirates to reach the open ocean and Europe. Next up is the Bermuda Triangle and the Sargasso Sea. After10 days of turning into a passable blue water sailor you can explore Bermuda.

Embark
Mon, 01-03-2021 - 18:00
St Martin- St Maarten
Disembark
Thu, 11-03-2021 - 10:00
St Georges, Bermuda
Duration
10 Nights
Vessel
Eye of the Wind
Voyage No.
EYE21/09

Berths and voyage availability

TYPE: 2 Berth Ensuite Cabin Per person. AVAILABILITY: Available. PRICE: 1,450 EUR. BOOK NOW

Eye of The Wind - St Martin - Bermuda

IDEAL VOYAGE FOR...

Keen newcomers to sailing who want to try their first ocean passage in the sunshine and experienced ocean sailors who know they will revel in the blue ocean swell, peaceful atmosphere and sunshine as you make your way from St Martin in the Caribbean across the ocean to St Georges' in Bermuda.

Lap up the Caribbean sunshine and cooling trade winds before setting off on a 900 mile journey to Bermuda. Experience true blue ocean sailing, night sailing under the bright stars and help sail this traditional ship to the buzzing waterfront port of St George. 

VOYAGE HIGHLIGHTS

  • Soak up the Caribbean vibe on St Martin /St Maarten
  • hassle free ocean sailing
  • good whale and turtle spotting 
  • Avoid the Bermuda Triangle (sailing East of it!)
  • approx 900 nautical miles to Bermuda
  • Tropical nights - timeless in warm breeze
  • Bermuda and its pink sand beaches & sailors waterfront
last night in the caribbean
last night in the caribbean

 

FULL VOYAGE DESCRIPTION

If you want to escape the world and get into the relaxed rythmn of sailing a small square rigger with only 12 guest crew then this is a great voyage to chill. If you need more action it is always there, from the responsibility of standing a watch or making the ship sail faster to climbing the rigging to fishing for game fish. Enjoy tropical sunsets and getting to know your ship mates from all over the world. Your reward after 1000 miles of starlit tropical nights, fresh air and pulling on ropes will be the archipelago of islands known as Bermuda. Let the barman pour you are dark and stormy rum, and admire the pinky white beaches an colonial architecture.


On a sailing voyage we never use the word itinerary, as skippers will always be aiming for the best sailing and shore landings for the forecast and most idyllic or sheltered anchors and ports. They are as keen as you to include some of the highlights described below, but you have to go with Mother Nature, not fight her. The description below is based on what we think might be possible, based on past trips, or experience, but nothing is guaranteed on a sailing voyage.

Next Stop Bermuda....or one more beach anchorage?

St Martin is an island split down the middle with a French and a Dutch side. Join in Marigot wher there are gorgeous white beaches but also evidence of the hurricane damage a few years ago. The locals are a resourceful bunch and life goes on in paradise. You might swing through the British Virgin Isles archipelago or Anguilla, but after that, you are out in the deep blue Atlantic Ocean. The brief spell of sheltered water might be an opportune moment to try out the bowsprit netting or climb the rigging whilst everything is steady. It could be that the crew want to show you a favourite lunchtime anchorage and swim before you set off on this 870 mile journey, but we think they will probably be 'champing at the bit' to get to sea once more. In these latitudes who can blame them.

More Hands-On Sailing

The price of this voyage is cheaper than the Caribbean cruising so there is an assumption you are up for an adventure and taking part in a watch. This is an ideal voyage for potential career sailors who want to get their face known to the Eye of the Wind crew. Who knows, you might be back as a deckhand one day.

With decent sunshine, it is a great time to catch up on ship maintenance tasks from marlinespike seamanship to leatherwork and sail repairs. A chance to learn these skills with time on your hands is priceless.

Serving the standing rigging is a messy job but very absorbing
Serving the standing rigging is a messy job but very absorbing

Sargasso Sea & Wildlife

The Sargasso Sea, in the north Atlantic is the only sea to have no coastline and is named after the the free floating golden-brown seaweed known as Sargassum. The North Atlantic Drift current starts here. Due to the ocean current the coastless sea has a vast amount of wildlife so there should be many opportunities to use your camera. 

With experienced crew to show you the ropes, sails and general crew behaviour on board you will also learn how to spot wildlife, learn how to steer the ship, learn why the sails are set a particular way. Watch the pattern of the waves and understand the swell and how it is affected by the weather hundreds of miles away. Always keep an eye to the sky and try to foretell what the weather is going to do next. 

Once out into the ocean, a relaxing and comfortable routine will be established. Night sailing with absolutely no light pollution allows you to see the stars like you have never seen them before and a sight that you will not forget.  All of the seas moods will be encountered, from glassy calms to white capped swells where flying fish are launched from crest to crest.

A turtle rescue on another tall ship - shows how big they can be
A turtle rescue on another tall ship - shows how big they can be

The Art of Setting Stun'sails

The winds are likely to be light so rollng out the stun sail booms and setting the giant light wind stun sails can occupy a fair bit of the day. It is a good idea to practice getting them down quickly too, as this part of the world can get a bit thundery and squally. No doubt there will be much reference to the movie "White Squall" as Eye of the Wind was the star of that movie with Geoff Bridges.

Stunsails set on Eye of the Wind
Stunsails set on Eye of the Wind

White Sand Beaches of Bermuda Archipelago

Bermuda is only 21 square miles but comprises of 181 named islands sitting way out in the Atlantic, hundreds of miles from the USA and several thousand from the UK. An elegant destination of perfect sandy beaches palms and colonial old world charm Bermuda is decidedly British compared with the Bahamas. The beautiful colonial town of St George’s is sure to entice you, with it’s waterside bars and restaurants. Don’t forget to try a Rum Swizzle or a Dark and Stormy, the famous Bermudan cocktails.

WINDS, WAVES & WEATHER

Hard to predict the wind direction here. In 800 miles you are likely to experience the whole range of ocean sailing from trade wind blasts to oily calms and days when your best friend is the engineer. Luckily in the modern era you don't have to wallow in the Sargasso sea. Strategetic use of the engine and the weather forcasts means the captain will be trying to find the most sailing for each section of the route.

HANDS ON HOLIDAYS

Whether you are an experienced sailor or a complete beginner, the professional crew will train you to be guest crew from the moment you arrive, with the intention that everybody works together to sail the ship. The common thread to all Classic Sailing holidays is ‘Hands on’ participation on ships that use ropes, blocks and tackles and ‘people power’ to set sail.

SAILING STYLE & LIFE ON BOARD

We cater for a wide range of ages and physical abilities and how much you are expected to do varies a bit between vessels. See the vessel tab above which explains all about the ‘sailing style’ and what to expect in terms of hands on participation. There is a lot of information about day to day life, the ships facilities and accommodation on the vessel pages.

AGILITY & FITNESS

Every customer sailing with us will need to fill in basic medical questions on their booking application. If you are not sure if your current level of fitness and agility are up to a voyage, then please ring the Classic Sailing Office on 01872 58 00 22 and we can chat through your concerns and possibly find options that might suit you better.

WHAT’S INCLUDED

  • Skipper & professional crew
  • Personal Safety Equipment
  • Sailing Instruction
  • All meals, snacks and refreshments
  • Port and landing fees
  • Linen and duvets
  • Third Party liability insurance

WHAT’S NOT INCLUDED

  • Travel to Joining Port
  • Travel from end port
  • Alcoholic Drinks
  • Towels
  • Waterproofs

 

 

St Martin / St Maarten

Latest port updates

The tiny French-Dutch island of Saint-Martin, covering just 88km², is nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and is renowned for its friendly welcome! The international airport is in the Dutch half of the island known as Sint Maarten. Ports like Marigot are on the French side to the North.

Much more than a beach lovers paradise, the island of St Martin with natural, cultural and amazingly friendly locals. Thanks to its climate and untouched natural heritage, the island offers unparrelleled year-round watersports and outdoor activity.

St Martin has its own unique identity, making it the perfect sunshine getaway to start or end a voyage. You will also find that the people of Saint Martin – fiercely proud of their "Friendly Island", reputation – are very helpful.

Joining Blue Clipper in 2019 - the boat will plan to be anchored in Marigot Bay however its exact location will be open to change due to the port authorities. 

How to get here

By Road & Parking

St. Martin’s road system essentially comprises a ring road that skirts the island’s coastline and smaller roads linking the built-up areas.
The courtesy of St. Martin’s road users is much fabled, and it is customary here for drivers to use their horn to greet others. In spite of the odd traffic jam in the high tourist season due to the island’s inadequate infrastructure, driving on St. Martin is relatively stress-free drive.

Getting around by taxi

Taxis do not have meters but charge according to a fixed fee, and that some taxis, especially those on the Dutch side, only accept US Dollars.

Taxis leave from outside Grand Case Regional Airport, the ferry terminal on Marigot waterfront (French side) and Princess Juliana International Airport (Dutch side).

Mini bus services

Group taxis (minibuses) cover most areas of the island. There is no fixed time table however there are dedicated bus stops. Simply wait at of the bus stop and raise your hand to alert the driver when a minibus arrives. Buses generally accept Euros and US dollars.

Renting a car or motorcycle/scooter on St. Martin

its a great way to see the island but drivers must hold a French or international driving licence, which covers them across the territory.

Air & transfers

Air France, Air Caribes and Corsairfly offer daily scheduled flights to St Maartin from Paris Charles de Gaulle or Orly. Flying time for direct flights is around 8 hours 45 minutes. Flights stopping in Guadeloupe bring the flight time to 11 hours.

KLM  and TUI netherlands has direct flights from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport Amsterdam (Netherlands). With a flight time on approximately 8 hours they take off and land at Princess Juliana Aiprort on the Durch Side. 

American Airlines, United airlines, Continental airlines, Delta airlines, JetBlue allow you flights from the United States to St Martin

 

Places to stay, Things to do, Travel companions

Classic Sailing invites to a private facebook group where you can connect with other sailors who have booked with us. If you want to find a travel companion or share ideas on accommodation options before your trip, then posting a request on this is this is a safer option than our public facebook page. (due to data protection laws we cannot pass on contact details for other sailors on your trip directly)

Your travel responsibilities

Passports and Visas***

*** “Classic Sailing cannot cover every possible visa scenario as customers may have dual nationality, or be working or living in a country different from their passport nationality.

To avoid any last-minute stress, we advise you to contact the local embassies of the countries you will be visiting in your country to find out which travel documents you need. Please start early, obtaining a visa can take some time. It is your responsibility to have the right travel documents for all countries you visit during your stay on board.

If you plan to travel onto other destinations please check you have a right to stay in the country too as you may be classed as arriving in a country as ‘yacht sailors in transit’ and not have same rights as a tourist.

Even if you don’t need a visa, please check your passport expiry date is sufficient for country entry requirements.”***

Travel, Health, Vaccinations and Safety

Security for tourists in certain countries, regions or cities can change rapidly. Please check with your own Government Foreign Office for their latest advice for travellers.

UK travellers check under specific destination at https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice

Likewise we suggest you check if there are any recommended or required vaccinations well before departure as some take more than one jab. For UK travellers check out ‘Fit for Travel’ http://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/destinations

Travel Insurance

It is compulsory that you have travel insurance to sail on any of our voyages, but you do not have to buy the insurance from us. If you purchase your own please make sure it covers sailing as an activity, and racing if you are racing crew. Most our voyages sail further than 3 miles from the shore so check that you will be covered sailing outside territorial waters.

Classic Sailing recommend Topsail Insurance http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/travel-insurance They have policies designed for sailing crew on yachts or tall ships, whether you want an annual policy or a single trip. These are suitable for UK based sailors but the page also has links to alternative companies and recommended insurance companies for non UK citizens.

St Georges, Bermuda

Latest port updates

The joining ports in Bermuda are usually either St Georges or Hamilton, once the port is known it will be communicated to you. 

For Blue Clipper 2019 season, St George's will be the start or end port. 

How to get here

Air & transfers

L.F.Wade International Airport (BDA) is the only airport on Bermuda. British Airways offers direct flights from London or connecting flights with American Airlines via the US.

On arrival, taxi is the best way of getting to the disembarkation point, just for ease of time and comfort. However, if you have time on your hands, then exploring the island by bus, scooter or pedal cycle is fun. Remember, they drive on the left!

Bermudas currency is the Bermudan Dollar, which is tied to the US dollar. It can only be used in Bermuda, so do not take out more than you need. Ensure that you change back any unspent dollars before returning home.

Places to stay, Things to do, Travel companions

Bermuda is a British overseas territory, having been settled by the Brits in 1609, making it the oldest and most populous remaining British overseas territory. It is also the oldest continuously inhabited English town in the Americas.

Classic Sailing invites to a private Facebook group where you can connect with other sailors who have booked with us. If you want to find a travel companion or share ideas on accommodation options before your trip, then posting a request on this is this is a safer option than our public Facebook page. (due to data protection laws we cannot pass on contact details for other sailors on your trip directly)

Your travel responsibilities

Passports and Visas***

*** “Classic Sailing cannot cover every possible visa scenario as customers may have dual nationality, or be working or living in a country different from their passport nationality.

To avoid any last-minute stress, we advise you to contact the local embassies of the countries you will be visiting in your country to find out which travel documents you need. Please start early, obtaining a visa can take some time. It is your responsibility to have the right travel documents for all countries you visit during your stay on board.

If you plan to travel onto other destinations please check you have a right to stay in the country too as you may be classed as arriving in a country as ‘yacht sailors in transit’ and not have same rights as a tourist.

Even if you don’t need a visa, please check your passport expiry date is sufficient for country entry requirements.”***

Travel, Health, Vaccinations and Safety

Security for tourists in certain countries, regions or cities can change rapidly. Please check with your own Government Foreign Office for their latest advice for travellers.

UK travellers check under specific destination at https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice

Likewise we suggest you check if there are any recommended or required vaccinations well before departure as some take more than one jab. For UK travellers check out ‘Fit for Travel’ http://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/destinations

Travel Insurance

It is compulsory that you have travel insurance to sail on any of our voyages, but you do not have to buy the insurance from us. If you purchase your own please make sure it covers sailing as an activity, and racing if you are racing crew. Most our voyages sail further than 3 miles from the shore so check that you will be covered sailing outside territorial waters.

Classic Sailing recommend Topsail Insurance http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/travel-insurance They have policies designed for sailing crew on yachts or tall ships, whether you want an annual policy or a single trip. These are suitable for UK based sailors but the page also has links to alternative companies and recommended insurance companies for non UK citizens.

Eye of the Wind

'Eye of the Wind' is one of the most photogenic and well loved tall ships in the world. She has sailed around the world to legendary locations like Pitcairn Island, New Zealand and Cape Horn, been the star of films like White Squall' and has spent decades as an adventure charter vessel and expedition ship. Today she sails 12 months of the year, offering a mix of adventure and themed travel holidays. Tropical and offshore island paradises feature strongly in her winter sailing programme as well as being the most photogenic ship at summer tall ship festivals and entering some of the great waterfront cities of Northern Europe.

 

Statistics

 

  • Length overall: 40m (132ft)
  • Length on deck: 32m

 

  • Year built: 1911
  • Vessel rig: Brig 

 

  • Guest berths:12
  • Crew berths: 10

 

Eye of the Wind in the Caribbean. Photo by H P Bleck
Eye of the Wind in the Caribbean. Photo by H P Bleck

Ocean Wandering & Island Paradises

Eye of the Wind has a tried and tested formula for winter sun escapes. Following the old trade wind routes you would expect for a square-rigger that likes to sail as much as possible, she heads South for a short season in the Canaries. The North East Trades whisk her across the Atlantic for those who fancy a classic ocean passage in the sun as a way of digital detoxing for a month. 

Christmas and New Year are usually spent in the Caribbean. With only 12 guest crew on a 132ft ship the experience is pretty exclusive and there are plenty of places to seek some space, so Eye of the Wind is a good choice for couples and romantics. 

Eye of the Wind Anchored off Guadeloupe

Beautiful Wooden Interior

She wears her 100 years well, having undergone several quality restorations, all of which have helped create a ship interior full of beautiful wood and salvaged antique fittings. Her square rig is totally traditional and all sails are hoisted by human power and blocks and tackles.

Englishman Tiger Timbs and a bunch of tall ship enthusiasts started the story when they converted her to a brigantine. The ship's hull is steel, but the whole feel of the ship is wood. The deck was created from a teak dance floor, the benches in the saloon where salvaged from a church. A wealthy Danish owner lavished money on turning her into a luxury private sailing ship capable of global cruising, but kept the square rig totally authentic and human powered. Today she is available for all to sail again with German owners who love tall ships, team building and old style adventuring on the seven seas.

Below decks style on Eye of The Wind
Below decks style on Eye of The Wind

A Stylish Way to See Europe

The Baltic is a hot place in summer and steeped in maritime history. Bounded by Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Germany, Poland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia you can visit more than one country in a voyage easily. There are hundreds of islands, intricate navigation and some of the most iconic waterfront cities in Europe. If you are looking for a unique way to understand European culture and history, then sailing between ports on a multi-nationally crewed ship that once carried cargoes through the 1920's and 30's all around the Baltic.

There is a huge fleet of wooden sailing ships around the Baltic, as well as numerous large windjammers so tall ship festivals here are well attended. Outdoor parties, music and parades of sail are a colourful way to see ports like Hamburg, Copenhagen or any historic city with enough dock space to create a tall ship gathering. Let Eye of the Wind show you here home sailing ground during the summer, or try out a short taster in preparation for a more exotic adventure on her further afield.

Sailing Style

No sailing experience is needed as full training is given so you can learn take part in sailing this well maintained and authentically rigged sailing ship. With square sails on both masts and stun'sails for ocean passages you have a great square rig classroom for those who want to learn as much as they can. She has 8000 square foot of sail (750 sq metres) which is quite a spread of red canvas, so good speeds are possible.

Sun deck cushions - not your average sail training ship
Sun deck cushions - not your average sail training ship

Life on Board

Guest crew are all encouraged to take part in the active assistance in sail handling and on board routine of watches and steering the ship. No one is obliged to co-operate. It is your holiday and there is a professional crew of up to 10 for 12 guests. If you are in the mood for a challenge climbing the rigging is possible but don't worry if you have never been up before. You will always be under the guidance of the ships crew and is a great thrill.

The ships crew are typically 20-40 and a mix of all nationalities. They are pretty dedicated to the lost art of traditional seamanship and rope work so you will have plenty of teachers if you want to help maintain the ship. 

If you just want to chill on a deck cushion or hope for dolphins in the bowsprit netting that is ok too. The ship has a library and characterful spaces to relax below decks too.

there is always a reason to go aloft on a brig
there is always a reason to go aloft on a brig

 

Social Areas on Board include:

There is a lower saloon with a library and skylights above for natural light.

The upper saloon is close to the galley for meals

There is a sun deck area to relax on deck

There is a ships bar to purchase drinks

Eye of the wind - cabin Photo HP Bleck
Eye of the wind - cabin Photo HP Bleck
interior on eye of the wind
upper saloon and galley

 

Guest Cabins

There are 6 luxurious cabins, all with en suite bathrooms. All have air conditioning and bed linen is provided. There are 230v sockets (British? or Euro pin?)

There are 16 berths within these 6 cabins, but generally, she only takes 12 guest crew so the cabins are ideal for couples, friends or solo travellers happy to share a cabin with a guest of the same sex.

Sole occupancy.

If you do not want to share a twin cabin they are available for sole occupancy, there is an extra charge of 50% of the voyage fee subject to availability.

eye of the wind-interior layout

 

Eye of the Wind - Full Ship Specification

Year built: 1911 in Brake, Germany

Rig: 3 masted Gaff rigged Schooner

Length overall: 40.23m (132ft)

Beam: 7.01m (23ft)

Draught: 2.7m (8.9ft)

Sail Area: 750 m² (8000 sq ft)

Areas of operation: Worldwide

Number of guests: Up to 16

Number of permanent crew: 8-10

Berth types: 6 Luxury cabins with ensuite bathroom and air conditioning. Typically cabins used for 2 people only but some have more than 2 berths.

Generators - 240v

Navigation & Comms:

Radar, VHF, MF and HR (worldwide) and GPS

Fax and Satellite coms

British flagged vessel.

Captain Fabian on Eye of the Wind
Captain Fabian on Eye of the Wind

The ship has a crew and relief crew for a proper crew rotation

Captain Fabian

I've been sailing since I was five years old, even though I grew up far from the seashore: I'm from Munich/Germany.

After my boatbuilding apprenticeship, I spent a lot of time on the water, mainly I delivered yachts from A to B. With the completion of my nautical studies came the opportunity to eventually sail on larger ships. I am very much looking forward to meeting interesting people on every new sailing trip, from whom I can learn something, and in return I can teach them a little bit about sailing a windjammer.

My dream destination with the Eye of the Wind would be the island world of Micronesia in the western Pacific Ocean. Maybe one day we will even go there together ...?

Captain Pitt

Since the age of 26, I am working in seafaring. In Enkhuizen, the Netherlands, I attended the Seafaring School, and at the end of my entire training, I earned the title "Master (all ships)". After a long time on mechant ships, my way now led back to sailing - finally!


I've known the Eye of the Wind for a long time, because a colleague from the Nautical School was her captain for nine years - so my predecessor. Sailing is a beloved and lived passion for me. The special thing about this ship is: I am the captain on board, but I can not sail alone from A to B - here everyone works together.


My dream destination with the Eye of the Wind? - The island world of the South Pacific!

1st Mate Megan

Megan from Australia is now First Mate of Tall Ship Eye of the Wind. She joined the crew in 2014 and brings a lot of sailing experience with her. She introduces herself:

I'm from Western Australia, where my father took me sailing as a child. As I got older, I sailed on an Australian sail training ship as a volunteer watch leader - that was in 2008.

Before I attended the Sailing Academy in Fremantle/Australia, I worked on several ships. After finishing my education there, I sailed overseas for the first time and took part in Tall Ships' Races in European waters.

I first saw the Eye of the Wind in 2013, when she was cruising off the Caribbean island of Saint-Barthélemy under full sails, and I instantly fell in love with the ship. One year later, I joined her crew as a deckhand, today I work as a first mate. As a Master, I am allowed to operate vessels up to a size of 200 GT, as a Chief Mate up to 300 GT (Gross Tons).

I would love to sail around Cape Horn with the Eye of the Wind one day. Until then, I love to share my experience with our fellow sailors. I hope that I can make you feel as passionate for sailing as I do!

Eye of the Wind First Mate - Megan
Eye of the Wind First Mate - Megan

1st Mate Moritz

Chef Alex

Chef Esme

Engineer Jarek

Engineer Xavier

Bonjour, I'm from Rouen in French Normandy. At the age of 19, I began to study Naval Architecture in England for four years.

I discovered sailing in 2007 - I was so enthusiastic that I spent an entire year on a yacht in the Caribbean. After that, I went back to France, where I attended the Merchant Navy School for another two years. After five years as an engineer on different supertankers, I switched to a private yacht in 2016, where I worked as a machinist.

In the meantime, I also worked for the marine conservation organization Sea Shepherd before volunteering aboard a cargo ship, sailing into Barbados. There I met the Eye of the Wind for the first time in 2019. The decision to join her crew was easy.

On board, I'm often "invisible" when I'm in the engine room, because I like to work thoroughly - and that may take a little bit longer. I look forward to meeting you aboard! Visiting the port city of Valparaiso in Chile one day with the Eye of the Wind ... that would be the fulfillment of a dream for me.

Xavier - Eye of the Wind engineer
Xavier - Eye of the Wind engineer

Deckhands vary but currently we have:

Ayla, Lea and Manja

Eye of the Wind - Kit List

clothing tips and packing lists

Working Language on Board

German and English

What is Included

  • Sailing Instruction
  • All meals to include refreshments throughout the day
  • Duvet, pillow and sheets
  • Hand towels

What is not Included

  • Waterproof jackets and trousers
  • Alcoholic drinks but there is a bar on board
  • Any entry visas required

What to Bring

Suitcases take up a lot of room in a cabin, so it is better to uses soft bags in a ship. A small rucksack for going ashore is useful.

  • Eye of the Wind does not supply waterproof jackets and salopette type trousers. Please bring your own waterproof clothing.
  • A mix of warm and wind proof clothing.
  • Lots of thin layers is better than one thick layer in cold destinations.
  • In tropical countries - long sleeves and long trousers to protect you from the sun
  • Footwear on board needs a good grip and soft soles- the decks are wood or steel.
  • Ashore stout, waterproof walking boots are best if you are in remote places.
  • Eye of the Wind has electric sockets in all the cabins 240 V 
  • Cameras, spare batteries, chargers if you need them
  • Binoculars are handy for bird watching etc.
  • Suntan lotion, hats, sunglasses
  • Dont forget any regular medication, persciption glasses and spare
  • Euros for bar bill 
  • Passport, travel insurance, tickets etc
  •  To get ashore is usually by dinghy so be prepared to get wet feet. Rubber boots or quick drying sandals - depending on the location.
  • The ship provides hand towels but please bring a beach towel
  • snorkel and mask for caribbean if you like snorkelling (travel tip: swimming goggles pack up smaller than a facemask)
  • Bring insect repellant for Caribbean as can get mosquitos ashore in evening (rare at anchor)
  • ear plugs can be handy 

 

Electricity

All the power to your plug sockets comes from the ship's generator which runs on deisel. The less the generators have to run to top up power, the nicer it is for the guests on board and also greener for the planet. Please don't bring loads of hairdriers, electric devices to charge.

There is no internet on board whilst at sea. 

Off

Eye of the Wind - Reviews

crew and guests aloft on eye of the wind

Eye of the Wind is an experienced operator with many happy customers, but she is new to Classic Sailing website. We will post the first Classic Sailing guest feedback from 2019-2020 voyages as soon as we have some, it but here are a few from last year. 

Facebook Reviews currently 5 out of 5 stars Oct 2019

 

Tortola to the Azores! What a great time. Thanks to Captain Pit and the crew. An awesome adventure with awesome people!" F Coutreau, New England

 

What a wonderful, lovely, great, awesome trip we've had from Malaga to Lanzarote! I loved and enjoyed every minute.

Thanks again for this wonderful experience. I miss you guys! Andrea Schwartz

Off

Itinerary

On a sailing voyage, we never use the word itinerary, as skippers will always be aiming for the best sailing and shore landings for the forecast and most idyllic or sheltered anchors and ports. They are as keen as you to include some of the highlights described above, but you have to go with Mother Nature, not fight her.

Visas and Vaccinations

Classic sailing is unable to be an expert for advice on visas and vaccinations for customers traveling outside their own country.

Please seek advice relating to your nationality traveling to the countries of your voyage from the country you will be setting off from and returning to.

Passports

In most instances, you will need a passport that expires six months or more after your return to your home country.

What others say about us

CURRENT AVERAGE   4.6 STARS
249 REVIEWS

Facebook reviews

"A life changing experience with talented crew who gave us hope for mankind ...and biscuits"

Customer comments

Read what the press say about our holidays
 

Magazine articles

 

Why book with Classic Sailing?

The call of the sea

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traditional boats and tall ships.

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6 Times Around the World between Us

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